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Sound Proof your Jeep
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Sound proof your Jeep Short Cuts

By: Greg Colburn-07/2003



Clear out everything you don't want to spray.
Using masking tape and kraft paper, mask out the rest of the interior.
The DuraLiner is thin, but it will do the job.
Nest the sheets on the floor to ensure proper coverage.

Jeep owners for the most part don't buy them for the quiet ride or sports car handling. With the numerous upgrades that we perform, slowly the interior noise level starts getting louder and louder. Those new mud tires, bigger lift, and high-flow exhaust systems all have an affect on how loud the ride is inside the Jeep as well as outside. One easy upgrade that you can do to combat this is to apply spray-on bedliner and sound proofing material.

First thing you want to do is to strip the interior of anything that you don't want to be sprayed with bedliner. Anything that you cannot remove, can easily be masked off with masking tape to avoid overspray. After I cleared out the inside, the next step was to apply 24" kraft paper over the areas that are left (dash, windshield, steering column). With the masking now out of the way, it was time to start spraying. Because I was going to be covering up the floor of the Jeep with sound proofing material, I chose to use Duraliner spray-on bedliner. Although the Duraliner is thinner than most roller applied material, it will still aid in protecting the floor and is much easier to apply.

Once the bedliner has cured, the time has come to start laying out the sound proofing material. I chose Tsunami Premium Sound Mat because I have used it before and liked the results, and it contains a thin Mylar film that makes an excellent heat shield if you are routing your exhaust under your feet. Remove all of the masking tape from the interior and start laying out the 12" x 24" sheets of Mylar. Once you have nested the pieces on the floor the way you want them, peel off the backing and start sticking the sheets to the floor. Make certain that once you pull the backing off and stuck it to the floor, it is where you wanted it. These sheets have super adhesive on them, so once they are on it is very difficult to remove.

After each sheet has been attached to the floor you must use a heavy roller to further bond the material to the metal floor. Tsunami offers a 5lb roller for this, or if you have a laminate roller laying around, that will work also. When rolling the sheets, it is very important that all of the air bubbles are taken out because this will affect the performance of the sound proofing sheets. It is also a good idea to use a pair of gloves when handling Mylar, due to it's stiffness and sharp edges, it makes a papercut seem like an enjoyable experience.

All that is left now is to replace all of the parts that you removed when prepping the interior for the bedliner, and replace the carpet if so equipped.

With the new bedliner and Tsunami Sound Proofer installed, the interior noise level has been reduced quite a bit. I no longer need a 500 watt amplifier to hear the traffic report, and the Mylar has cut down the heat that was soaking up through the floor boards from the exhaust.





Here is the completed front portion of the interior. Spray the rear section as you did the front portion. Ensure that you get good coverage on the floor of the vehicle. That's it, with the job completed replace the carpet (If equipped)..







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