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Adam Fertig

Swapping a Toyota V6 for a Chevy V8 using Advance Adapters Bellhousing

Engine on Hoist

Using the Th350 would give me a little more shock protection on the driveline.  The automatic transmission will help cushion driveline shock.  And, I know it would hold up to V8 power.  But the gear ratios are pretty high, and the transfer case is huge.  Using the R150F would give me about twice as low of a gear ratio, and a more enjoyable driving experience with the 5 speed.  Plus my drivelines would bolt right up.  Cons would be buying a bell-housing adapter, and possible strength issues.  But the R-series transmission are used in Supras pushing 600hp and they hold up, so I'm not too worried.

First thing to do, of course, would be to pull the engine.  To make this easier for my situation, I decided to remove the front core support.  My truck is parked in my garage, which has a low ceiling and garage door.  I wouldn't be able to get the cherry picker high enough to clear the core support and not hit the garage door.   Plus, my core support was bent from a previous encounter with a tree.

After spending a lot of time drilling spot welds in order to remove the core support, I removed the engine.

With the engine out of the way, I prepped the engine bay for the V8.  I removed all the parts from the V6 that I would no longer need.  The only wires left were oil sender, coolant temp sender, tach wire, fuel lines, clutch lines, starter solenoid wire, and a few wires going back to the transmission (reverse indicator, 4wd indicator, and speed-o cable).  I also decided to paint the bay flat black since sometime down the road I will paint the entire truck flat black.

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John Stewart

Toyota Tech: Pickup and 4Runner VIN Information

Toyota Tech: Pickup and 4Runner VIN Information

Http://www.4x4Wire.com/toyota/faq/vin
Short Cuts
| Toyota Section | Toyota Tech | Maintenance Section |

The following vehicle identification number (VIN) information can be useful in determining the factory equipment of your Toyota truck. Note that changes could have been made by previous owners that will not be reflected on identification plates. This is a living document that is meant to be all inclusive, but certainly there are details that have been missed. Further information can be found listed by model year or part.
VIN Location Information




VIN Numbers



Model Numbers

Axle Codes



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staff_user

Retrofitting a Factory Toyota Elocker


The Toyota electric locker was an easy choice for me. I could pick one up for $400 used from a junkyard and make the controller for a few bucks. If the power is lost on the elocker, it will still be locked, and can be manually unlocked at any time.

In order to install the elocker, several modifications have to be made to the axle housing. These modifications are explained in great detail on several other websites, so I'm not going to go into great detail. Read these web pages and then continue reading this.

http://www.4x4wire.com/toyota/tech/electric_locker/

http://67.122.16.97/carterman/4runner/mods/locker/

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staff_user

Suspension install on 3rd gen 4Runner (96-02)


Front install:

My front setup includes OME 881 heavy duty coil springs, Cornfed 2" aluminum spacers, and Bilstein heavy duty shocks.

First thing you should do is spray all the bolts with some PB blaster. This stuff works wonders on stuck and rusted bolts. Just spray it and let it sit for a few minutes. Makes life easier.

Then raise the vehicle up and support it on jack stands. Make sure to lift it high enough that you can droop the lower a-arm assembly down far enough that it doesn't hit the ground. Then remove the wheels.

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staff_user

IFS Driveshaft CV Modification for Increased Angle


 

Procedure

The tools I used for this project are an angle grinder, a die grinder with a carbide burr, a small sledge hammer, a flat-head screwdriver, a sturdy vise, some small washers, and a small pick or piece of wire and a magnet in case I end up needing to fish out needle roller bearings.

If all you plan to do is get the joint apart to clearance it, the only u-joint caps you need to remove are the ones in the center section of the joint (which I'll call the "H" from here on out).

The basic method I use to remove u-joints is the same as used in this article. It's fast and effective. Reading the article will help you understand how I disassemble this CV joint.


1. Start by removing the grease zerks and c-clips from the u-joint caps you plan on taking out. Use a flat head screwdriver to dig into the grime and to pry and hammer the clips off.

2. Support the flange end of the CV on top of the jaws of the vise. Pound on the "H" with the sledge hammer. A few good whacks will bring the cap up.
Flip the joint over and do the same thing to the cap on the opposite side. Hold the joint at a certain angle to get the cap to be able to be pounded out as far as possible, however this still wont be far enough to get ahold of the caps to get them out.

3. At this point, you should be able to move the joint cross back and forth between the two caps. If any of the needle roller bearings have fallen out of place, use a pick or some wire and a magnet to get them all out. If you don't, they will be ruined when you try to pound the caps the rest of the way out, and then you will need a new u-joint. The same goes if you lose any of them, so be very careful if you plan to re-use the joint (Hint- pumping some new grease into the joints prior to disassembly may help keep the bearings in place).

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OutdoorWire, 4x4Wire, JeepWire, TrailTalk, MUIRNet-News, and 4x4Voice are all trademarks and publications of OutdoorWire, Inc. and MUIRNet Consulting. Copyright (c) 1999-2019 OutdoorWire, Inc and MUIRNet Consulting - All Rights Reserved, no part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without express written permission. You may link freely to this site, but no further use is allowed without the express written permission of the owner of this material. All corporate trademarks are the property of their respective owners.