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News and information about environmental and land management action involving federal agencies

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U.S. Forest Service, BLM, USFWS, NPS, Energy, EPA
John Stewart

Inyo NF Forest Plan Workshops

Inyo National Forest Preparing to Revise 1988 Forest Plan

--Workshops to be Held on Collaboration in Forest Planning, Nov. 16 & 17--

The Inyo National Forest has been designated as an “early adopter” forest by the Forest Service, indicating that the Inyo will be in the first tier of eight national forests to revise their Forest Plan under the new National Forest Land Management Planning Rule adopted earlier this year. The Inyo’s existing plan was completed in 1988.

Forest Plans provide strategic direction to guide the management of forest resources. They are programmatic in nature and provide a framework that guides site-specific project and activity decision making. The new Planning Rule directs that the Forest Plans will be science-based and developed collaboratively with stakeholders who are interested in the management of national forests. The Inyo National Forest is committed to collaboration, improving transparency in the planning process, and strengthening the role of public involvement in the process through opportunities for dialogue about forest plan issues.

Forest Supervisor Ed Armenta would like to invite anyone interested in learning more about the Forest Plan Revision Process, and specifically about the collaborative process the Inyo is proposing to use, to come to one of two workshops on November 16 or 17. Two identical workshops are being planned to accommodate those who can best attend during the work week and those who can best attend outside of normal working hours. Since Bishop is the most central for those participating from the Eastern Sierra both workshops will be held in Bishop at the Inyo National Forest Supervisor’s Office, 351 Pacu Lane, according to the following schedule:


Friday November 16, 9-12 a.m.

Saturday November 17, 9-12 a.m.


The first half of each workshop will consist of presentations and opportunities for questions and answers regarding the Forest Plan Revision process, including an orientation to what a Forest Plan is and what it is not; and a presentation on a Draft Collaboration and Communication Plan for the Plan Revision effort. The second half of the workshop will be an interactive format where participants will have an opportunity to work together on helping to finalize the Collaboration and Communication Plan. Discussions will be on such topics as prioritizing communication tools and techniques for involving a diverse array of stakeholders, collaborative opportunities for the three year Plan Revision process, and how to monitor the progress of the communication and collaboration effort. The workshops will be facilitated by Center for Collaborative Policy facilitator Laura Kaplan.

An opportunity to participate in the workshop via conference call and webinar will be available for the first half of the workshop, with those participating in this way having the ability to provide feedback on the workshop topics in a written format.

For more information about the workshops or the Forest Plan Revision process, or if you have special needs in order to participate, or to find out how to participate remotely, please call Public Affairs Officer Nancy Upham at 760-873-2427, or email her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Original author: John
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John Stewart

Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project News

Monthly Status Report:  October 1-31, 2012

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in Arizona on the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests (ASNF) and Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR) and in New Mexico on the Apache National Forest (ANF) and Gila National Forest (GNF).  Non-tribal lands involved in this Project are collectively known as the Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area (BRWRA).  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at http://www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at http://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf.  Past updates may be viewed on either website, or interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting http://www.azgfd.gov/signup.  This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Reintroduction Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

Original author: Arizona


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John Stewart

Forest Service law enforcement searching for individual(s) who placed rebar in roads

“The end of the rebar has been flattened and sharpened to a point and the exposed point has been painted to blend in with the road surface,” said Mogollon Rim District Ranger Linda Wadleigh. “The objects pose a serious threat to everyone, and that doesn’t just mean people recreating on a motorcycle or OHV, it includes people walking, hiking and even wildlife. We are taking this very seriously and asking the public to keep an eye out and report suspicious activity in the area.”

The U.S. Forest Service will pay up to $1,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible.  Anyone with information regarding who may be placing these dangerous rebar should contact Forest Service law enforcement at 928-527-3511.

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John Stewart

Climate Change Report Released

Climate Change in Grasslands, Shrublands, and Deserts of the Interior American West: A Review and Needs Assessment

FORT COLLINS, Colo., Aug. 27, 2012 - Climate change poses as much risk to public and private grassland and shrubland ecosystems as it does to forested ecosystems yet receives less attention by the public and key stakeholders. Consequently, most climate change research concentrates on forested ecosystems, leaving grassland and shrubland managers with insufficient information to guide decision making.

The USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station published a comprehensive report summarizing climate change research and potential effects on grassland, shrub, and desert ecosystems. The report, “Climate Change in Grasslands, Shrublands, and Deserts of the Interior American West: A Review and Needs Assessment,” highlights current knowledge and future research essential to mitigate the prospective detrimental effects of climate change. It addresses animal, plant, and invasive species models and responses, vulnerabilities and genetic adaption, animal species and habitats, and decision support tools for restoration and land management.

Original author: Press
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John Stewart

Bishop Rebuts Remarks Made Today by Former DOI Secretary Bruce Babbitt

Notes that conservation lands overwhelmingly outweigh leased acres

WASHINGTON – House Natural Resources Public Lands and Environmental Regulation Subcommittee Chairman Rob Bishop (UT-01) issued the following statement in response to remarks delivered today by former Department of Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt encouraging the President to impose stricter federal lands policies that aim to limit multiple use and energy production:

“I would probably be willing to accept the ‘one for one’ concept if we started at the position of parity. At present, little more than 37 million acres of BLM land have been leased for oil and gas development, whereas 293 million acres have already been set aside for conservation. This disparity clearly favors conservation but also reinforces the fact that deserving places are already being protected.  Instead of villainizing American energy developers, Secretary Babbitt should accept the fact that energy development, multiple use, and conservation are not mutually exclusive activities,” said Bishop.

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